How do you read your books?

Hi people! Of late I’ve been swamped with way too many books and
content to pore over(from work and also personal life too). I’m
curious, how do you manage your reading? To be more specific, how do
you choose what you read, and how do you maintain consistency? How do
you make sure that you retain value in terms of what you read. On a
lighter note, for fictional reads, more-so long-form content you consume
for the fun of it, how do you go about sourcing this?

On a similar note, here’s an interesting post that’s been doing the
rounds on HN: https://vasilishynkarenka.com/learning/

That article roused things I’ve been thinking about. The mind dump is something I have been doing a lot in my notebook but I mix it with questions of what I’m learning, a summary too and it ends up becoming a very jumbled affair.
At this moment I have four books at my night stand, I tend to read two books in parallel but in recent weeks I decided to read one at a time(this was successful, I also found that it’s more successful when the book is interesting or involves a subject I am really curious about). At this time, I have made a roster of books that I want to read, and aim for reading some bit of the current book as soon as I wake up.

In terms of retention, I’ll give an example of what I’m reading now, ‘How not to be Wrong’ by Jordan Ellenberg, it’s a book about the hidden maths of everyday life. I make notes. Today I made mental notes:

a) What is a Laffer curve?
b)How does taxation work?
c) Is Scandinavia socialist?

I had found an answer to c a while ago but now I have to go back and check again.

On fictional reads, I tend to immerse myself fully painting a mental image. It helps me with remembering as it looks like a movie in my head, I tend to make notes of words that I don’t know, sometimes writing the excerpt of the sentence the word is used in. When I was reading ‘This Side of Paradise’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I did this.

Having a lot of things that require my attention, be it books, papers, even comic books is still something that I struggle with. I have the choice of taking in 3 at a time(This often time fails) or taking one and immersing myself into it and moving on to the next.
What has worked for me is reading consistently in bite sized chunks, making notes and sticking to it.

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Hi!

That article roused things I’ve been thinking
about. The mind dump is something I have been
doing a lot in my notebook but I mix it with
questions of what I’m learning, a summary too and
it ends up becoming a very jumbled affair.

Do you have a system in place for your notebook?
I’ve been religious about that— I use the Bullet
Journal system(see: https://bulletjournal.com/)

At this moment I have four books at my night
stand, I tend to read two books in parallel but in
recent weeks I decided to read one at a time(this
was successful,

I’ve tried that in the past(only reading one book
at a time), but that never worked out :frowning:

I also found that it’s more successful when the
book is interesting or involves a subject I am
really curious about).

I’m realizing now that there’s a whole art to
figuring out what books are interesting to you and
what to ignore. Also, this— choosing books you
like— feels awkward for me, but I’m learning to
ditch books that don’t cut it for me during a read
\m/\m/

At this time, I have made a roster of books that
I want to read, and aim for reading some bit of
the current book as soon as I wake up.

Smart \m/\m/. I try to set a fixed time for
reading— I’m experimenting with 1 hour a day(at
2PM).

In terms of retention, I’ll give an example of
what I’m reading now, ‘How not to be Wrong’ by
Jordan Ellenberg, it’s a book about the hidden
maths of everyday life.

This sounds interesting woOt woOt! Being less
wrong sometimes implies being more general/
vague. See PG’s article:
http://www.paulgraham.com/useful.html

He makes some interesting observations on
“correctness”.

I make notes.

Making notes is a whole other
ballgame. Note-taking is an art form IMHO; And for
most of us— if you’ve gone through the Kenyan
8-4-4 system— have to unlearn how to take
notes…

Today I made mental notes:
a) What is a Laffer curve?
b)How does taxation work?
c) Is Scandinavia socialist?

I had found an answer to c a while ago but now I have to go back and check again.

This sounds so cool. More-so the Laffer Curve
thing— haven’t looked it up though :slight_smile:

On fictional reads, I tend to immerse myself fully
painting a mental image. It helps me with
remembering as it looks like a movie in my head, I
tend to make notes of words that I don’t know,
sometimes writing the excerpt of the sentence the
word is used in. When I was reading ‘This Side of
Paradise’ by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I did this.

Ah yes! That’s why some movies based off novels
suck(like Harry Potter!); usually because the
visual depiction of the characters contrasts
(sharply) with your mental image. Weirdly, some
animes tend to get this right when depicting
manga(but at least they have a decent base to work
off from).

Having a lot of things that require my attention,
be it books, papers, even comic books is still
something that I struggle with. I have the choice
of taking in 3 at a time(This often time fails) or
taking one and immersing myself into it and moving
on to the next.
What has worked for me is reading consistently in
bite sized chunks, making notes and sticking to
it.

I wish we had all the time in the world— sadly,
we don’t :frowning:

Saw this on James Clear’s
newsletter(https://jamesclear.com/3-2-1/october-15-2020):

“Read books that are relevant to what you want to achieve and reading
will never seem boring.”

Thought this is relevant to the current thread :slight_smile: