This January, what will you be reading?

This January, as we start a new year, what books are you planning (or will you continue) to read?
[If possible] Why?

  • The Art of Not Giving a Fuck
  • The First Law Trilogy (I’m re-reading this)
  • SQL AntiPatterns
  • The google SRE book
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This January, as we start a new year, what books
are you planning (or will you continue) to read?
[If possible] Why?

Continuing reading:

  • Non Violent Communication: I want to get better
    at communicating.

  • Category Theory For Programmers: The author
    makes somes pretty big promises about helping
    the reader make more “composable” programs.

  • SICP: Been (slowly) reading this for some months
    read. Tackles alot of fundamentals in a nice
    way.

Planning to start:

  • The Rust Programming Language: Will be using
    this at work more often.

I’ve been reading alot of Manga/ Webtoons though:

  • The Boxer
  • Code Adam
  • KillMax
  • The Gamer(this one is Epic!)
  • Gul
  • God of Highschool
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The First Law Trilogy is amazing!! My favorite character is Logen Ninefingers. Who is yours?

All amazing reads. NVC sounds like an incredible tool for anyone’s quiver.

1 Like

The First Law Trilogy is amazing!! My favorite character is Logen Ninefingers. Who is yours?

Hands down Sand Dan Glokta! That man is bad-ass AF
:slight_smile:

The glory of a nation, then the dregs of the nation, then the glory of the nation again. I never related to the torturer, but I can see the appeal in his incredible story.

Already read “I Hear You: The Surprisingly Simple Skill Behind Extraordinary Relationships”. It’s simple clear and succinct.

Currently reading Mike Tyson’s autobiography “Undisputed truth”. Early chapters but the book is ridiculously funny.

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Have wanted to read “Undisputed truth” for a while now, think I’ll make it my next book. Wouldn’t mind some humour in my life right about now

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Currently reading “Free to Focus, A Total Productivity System to Achieve More by Doing Less” by Michael Hyatt (the guy who made the Design Sprint for Google)

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I’m currently intrigued by Jaron Lanier especially after watching The Social Dilemma.

I’ve just finished You Are Not a Gadget and planning to move onto Who Owns the Future? and Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now.

In You Are Not a Gadget, one of things he argues is that the open source software movement is actually devaluing progress and innovation.

I’m currently intrigued by Jaron
Lanier

especially after watching The Social Dilemma.

I’ve just finished You Are Not a Gadget and
planning to move onto Who Owns the Future?
and Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social
Media Accounts Right Now
.

In You Are Not a Gadget, one of things he
argues is that the open source software movement
is actually devaluing progress and innovation.

In this context, what does he mean by “open
source” software? There /is/, may I add, dear
interlocutor, a difference between “Free Software”
and “Open Source”[0]. I’m curious, what arguments
does he make against “open source”? How does that
devalue progress and innovation. And do you think
it applies to “Free software” too?

[0] https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-software-for-freedom.html

Highly recommended. It’s the first book in a while keeping me awake at night.

The Social Dilemma was a heroic documentary. Looking forward to your reviews of Jaron Lanier’s books.

In the case of the open source movement, he talks about how Linux is indeed a lovely and polished piece of code but it lacks originality(it is defined by Unix) and the young bright minds of today are trapped in an intellectual framework of the 1970’s thereby accepting old designs as if they are facts of nature.

He goes further to argue that the more sophisticated and original examples of code (like Adobe Flash, the page-rank algorithms and the iPhone) have come out of closed, tyrannically managed software shops. That for creativity to flourish, you need focus and the open source community it too connected to maintain its criteria over a long period of time.

He also tells the story of how Richard Stallman decided to write Unix after working on the LISP machine didn’t go too well. When Stallman told Lanier of his plan, Lanier was sad because Stallman chose to engage in “politically motivated code”.

He talks about a lot of other stuff like how open content inhibits the potential to grow wealth for the creative content producers leading to a concentration of wealth in a few individuals. He also talks a bit about his early exploits in virtual reality too.

I would suggest you take a shot and read it for yourself though (I’m just making a feeble attempt at paraphrasing).

[[[ Cc’ing the LUG to this discussion. Full thread
here:
This January, what will you be reading?]]]

Eastman via Urban Perspective Book Club
noreply@upbookclub.com writes:

In the case of the open source movement, he talks
about how Linux is indeed a lovely and polished
piece of code but it lacks originality(it is
defined by Unix) and the young bright minds of
today are trapped in an intellectual framework of
the 1970’s thereby accepting old designs as if
they are facts of nature.

Ah yes. There’s some truth to this :slight_smile:

He goes further to argue that the more
sophisticated and original examples of code (like
Adobe Flash, the page-rank algorithms and the
iPhone) have come out of closed, tyrannically
managed software shops. That for creativity to
flourish, you need focus and the open source
community it too connected to maintain its
criteria over a long period of time.

I’d be curious to see what the author defines as
creativity here. Yes, for some projects I’d opine
that things get too connected thereby making
progress slow; however, I’d also argue that
openness/freed /= strong cohesion with
communities.

He also tells the story of how Richard Stallman
decided to write Unix after working on the LISP
machine didn’t go too well. When Stallman told
Lanier of his plan, Lanier was sad because
Stallman chose to engage in “politically motivated
code”.

Well some of that “politically motivated code” has
done us some good :slight_smile: :wink:

He talks about a lot of other stuff like how open
content inhibits the potential to grow wealth for
the creative content producers leading to a
concentration of wealth in a few individuals. He
also talks a bit about his early exploits in
virtual reality too.

I would suggest you take a shot and read it for
yourself though (I’m just making a feeble attempt
at paraphrasing).

Sure! His books look promising :slight_smile:

I think from reading it you will see that he isn’t hating on open source or open content at all. He is just concerned that the importance of “the wisdom of the collective” is overemphasized and comes with the risk of sacrificing jumps in progress/innovation.

Eastman via Urban Perspective Book Club
noreply@upbookclub.com writes:

I think from reading it you will see that he isn’t
hating on open source or open content at all. He
is just concerned that the importance of “the
wisdom of the collective” is overemphasized and
comes with the risk of sacrificing jumps in
progress/innovation.

Yup! I’ll try reading this book… Thanks for the
recommendation!

Hi Martin!

Martin Akolo Chiteri martin.chiteri@gmail.com
writes:

Hello,

Just a few comments

[…]

Eastman via Urban Perspective Book Club
noreply@upbookclub.com writes:

In the case of the open source movement, he talks
about how Linux is indeed a lovely and polished
piece of code but it lacks originality(it is
defined by Unix)

Actually *BSDs have a lot more polish to their design and code with stellar
system documentation :slight_smile:

Thanks for these! I’ve began going through these
:slight_smile:

and the young bright minds of

today are trapped in an intellectual framework of
the 1970’s thereby accepting old designs as if
they are facts of nature.

Ah yes. There’s some truth to this :slight_smile:

I fully agree!

He goes further to argue that the more

sophisticated and original examples of code (like
Adobe Flash, the page-rank algorithms and the
iPhone) have come out of closed, tyrannically
managed software shops. That for creativity to
flourish, you need focus and the open source
community it too connected to maintain its
criteria over a long period of time.

I have seen the opposite of this argument made again from BSD world. The
claim is that BSDs are a lot more controlled and orderly. Think of Theo De
Raadt and his extremely tight leash that he maintains on OpenBSD or even
Linus Torvalds now with the Linux kernel and Richard Stallman with the GNU
project. Whereas the Linux kernel is chaotic, Linux is able to move in all
sorts of directions for this reason some of which are truly innovative
while *BSD have more carefully selected goals that are sharply focused on
and while avoiding hackish / dirty / incomplete solutions

The above are just someone’s opinion, so they are not necessarily right or
wrong. They only provide an alternative point of view on the topic.

I reckon what the author meant here is for those
truly innovative solutions, the Feynman-like
never-has-this-been-done before kind. I’m
speculating here though :wink:

[…]

PS: Eastman, is there a way on discourse to allow
cross posts (like say when someone does a
wide-reply on e-mail) appear on our discourse
chatroom? That would be neat. I wouldn’t mind
taking up the work of manually labelling spammers
:slight_smile: